Book review: You Lost Me There by Rosecrans Baldwin

6 Nov

No one ever tells you what a bloodbath marriage can be. Of course everyone says it’s hard, and you hear all these comments about how it’s a slog, how it’s unimaginably difficult, how crazy it can make even the most sane. But you never really believe all of that, because it’s hard to grasp when you’re on the outside, and it’s hard to imagine when you don’t really want to. You’re too busy being sure nothing will change after it happens. You’re too confident you’ll be the couple that rises above.

But it’s true. All of it. Some days it’s all you can do to wake up next to your spouse and resist the urge to hold a pillow over their face, or yours. Sometimes, even though you’d never admit this to anyone, you consider simply not showing up and doing all you can every day. There are fantasies of what it used to be like when you were Independent George, or what it could be, daydreams about freedom from everything heavy or unmanageable, thoughts that stay a little too long and detail a little too carefully the loopholes in the sheer hard labor that marriage requires.

Victor Aaron, the main character in You Lost Me There by Rosecrans Baldwin, is a man who has forgotten completely these truths. He sees the marriage he shared with his dead wife, Sara, as “a perfect, if tumultuous, duet between two opposite but precisely matched souls.” Until one day, he discovers a series of notecards Sara wrote as part of a couples therapy session, detailing the major shifts in their 30-year relationship, and the tectonic plates of Victor’s beliefs start to slip apart.

Peppered with a cast of characters who possess real depth and variety, You Lost Me There is a cornucopia of the complexities of what it means to be human – how our memories can betray us, how our bad habits can bog us down and hold us back, how our connections to other humans can break us utterly and yet still set us free.

Baldwin knows marriage, and it’s a little heartbreaking to read, if you know it, too. But his terrific writing, coupled with his amazing ability to splice scenes so that we are watching two characters in a conversation while one is experiencing something different in his head, save this novel from being overly sentimental, or even too bittersweet. 

For better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness and in health, this is a nuanced portrait of one man’s grief and of his journey towards, through, and out into the other side of change.

* * * * * * * *

This book was published by Riverhead Books in August 2010. For more information, visit the author’s website. You can also listen to the prologue by watching the book trailer. If you’d like to purchase this book and support independent booksellers at same time, click the IndieBound link that follows, and as always, happy reading. 

Shop Indie Bookstores

FTC Disclosure: This review was based on a copy of the book that I borrowed from the public library. 

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4 Responses to “Book review: You Lost Me There by Rosecrans Baldwin”

  1. Camille November 7, 2010 at 8:37 pm #

    Rosecrans Baldwin: that is the best name EVER.

    And it never before occurred to me that a pillow could be as dangerous as a firearm. Hmmm.

  2. Fran December 1, 2010 at 9:01 am #

    I just looked up the addresses of local indie bookstores. This book sounds perfectly delightful, as does the pending trip to said indie bookstore. I am intrigued, to say the least. (If I can’t find a copy of the book I will return to order via the link you’ve provided.)

  3. Ann's Rants December 4, 2010 at 8:07 pm #

    I want to read the book, but this review is a fantastic essay in and of itself.

    Yes and yes and oh dear lord yes.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Blue Truck Recommends: Books About Love « Blue Truck Book Reviews - February 10, 2011

    […] If love is different than you remembered it… You Lost Me There by Rosecrans Baldwin (read my review) […]

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