Archive | magical RSS feed for this section

Book review: French Leave by Anna Gavalda

6 Mar

When Garance and her siblings, Simon and Lola, find themselves trapped in the French countryside at a family wedding with their uppity, joy-killing sister-in-law, they quickly decide to make a stealthy escape and flee to visit their youngest brother, Vincent, who is working as a guide at a rural château. The four spend the afternoon together, rediscovering in their reunion the comfort and magic to be found inside their familial bonds.

Spanning one lovely, sleepy summer day, Anna Gavalda’s novel French Leave is a tender, bittersweet dreamscape of childhood memories, laughter, and the intimacy that only siblings can know. At 144 pages, this is a quick, spare novel, as full of terroir as any French wine. As poignant as it is melancholy, Gavalda’s gentle writing is spot-on in tone and pace, the just-right complement to its characters and subject matter.

Perfect for a warm, sunny Sunday morning – preferably in the heart of the French countryside, if you can swing it – French Leave is a small, charming getaway from the hectic everyday, a reminder that every once in a while, we must escape back into the arms of the past, and into the hearts of those who knew us when finding happiness was as simple as being together.

* * * * * * * *

This book will be published by Europa Editions in May 2011. For more information about the author or this novel, visit the publisher’s website. Purchasing this book from an independent bookseller will make you look more cultured and keep me in bottles of Sav  Blanc as an IndieBound affiliate (I wish). As always, happy reading.

FTC Disclosure: This review was based on a copy of the book that I received from the publisher.

Advertisements

Book review: Radioactive: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss

15 Feb

When Dwight Garner of The New York Times described Radioactive: A Tale of Love and Fallout by Lauren Redniss as “a deeply unusual and forceful thing to have in your hands,” he wrote the truth.

Redniss’ graphic book, an illustrated biography of Marie and Pierre Curie, is a fascinating, almost preternaturally delicate and beautiful creation. Her use of cyanotype printing – ethereal and spooky photographic images created in white on bright blue backgrounds – balances so perfectly with her writing that it’s difficult to choose which better mirrors and influences which: the art would be less without the writing, and the writing would be less without the art.

Whether you know anything about the Curies or not, whether you even care is irrelevant: Redniss weaves a captivating narrative, equal parts science, love story, and passion for life. Her great skill here is not only in her ability to tell an interesting tale, but luring us into truly understanding, perhaps for the first time for many of us, the unequivocally tremendous contribution the Curies made to science. She shows us, in a fresh and poignant way, how they changed the future.

It’s not often that a book is as visually bewitching as the words on its pages, but Redniss has somehow achieved this. Radioactive: A Tale of Love and Fallout is its own miraculous discovery.

* * * * * * * *

This book was published by It Books in December 2010. For more information, including the author’s explanation of why she was interested in the Curies, visit the author’s website. I’m an Indie Bound affiliate, so if you’d like to purchase this book, please consider doing so from an independent bookstore. As always, happy reading.

FTC Disclosure: This review was based on my own copy of this book.

Inside Petty Magic (plus book recommendations!): An Interview with author Camille DeAngelis

5 Oct

I could not be more pleased to tell you my dear friend has a book coming out today. Petty Magic by Camille DeAngelis is easily one of the best novels I’ve read this year, and I’m not just saying that because I like her and because she sends me cookies, t-shirts, absinthe lollipops, and all other manner of cool things you will never enjoy.

But obviously, our friendship creates a conflict of interest for me in reviewing her book. Shockingly, as I get older and — I don’t know how this happened — more professional, I care about things like conflicts of interest. So I won’t be getting into the hows and whys and the omg run out and buy this book right nows of a review, but I will be getting into a slew of questions, because this girl can still hook you up:

Your previous novel, Mary Modern, was inspired by a photograph of your great-grandmother, and what it would be like if you could communicate with her. Petty Magic also has a fantastical storyline, yet it’s also grounded in a very real way. How did you come up with the idea for this book?

In 2007 all I had was Fawkes & Ibis (the curiosity shop where Eve’s love interest works; I had cannibalized an earlier manuscript) and the bare-bones premise: old witch makes herself young again so she can go out to bars and seduce men. I knew it would be loads of fun to write, but initially I thought it was only meant to be a short story, and (for now anyway) I write short stories only for my own amusement.

Meanwhile, I’d been working on another novel idea—written thirty or forty pages and had done quite a bit of  research—and I’d shown the first chapter to my best writer friend. We were on a walk in the Silvermines, a rather spooky set of mountains in County Tipperary in Ireland, and he was saying that he liked the chapter and that it felt very fast-paced, like a novella—and I groaned because I knew then that the thing I was working on wasn’t going to pan out. [Editor’s note: read Camille’s blog post about that weekend here]

Then I told him my little idea about a randy old witch, and he said there was a novel in that for sure. I’m telling you where I was when I committed to the idea because I think it actually flavored the story—the following year I did a bit of traveling in the Harz Mountains, where the Grimm brothers collected their fairy tales, and had that same eerie feeling as we walked through the evergreen forest in the rain and fog.

I love your main character, Eve. She’s so feisty! Is there any Camille in Eve?

For me, the fun in making people up is giving them attributes you only wish you could have yourself—Eve is adventurous and supremely confident (to the point of arrogance; of course that’s not a trait I want for myself, but in fiction as in real life, ain’t nobody perfect). I do like to think I’ve grown more sure of myself in the three years since I began writing Petty Magic, though, so maybe I’m becoming a little more like Eve as I go along.

You’ve told me that you read several really interesting books as research for this novel. How does one even go about researching such wide topics as beldames, and World War II? Here’s your chance to geek out – any favorites or recommendations?

For a good overview of the female spies of World War II, I recommend Marcus Binney’s The Women Who Lived for Danger: The Agents of the Special Operations Executive and Sarah Helm’s A Life in Secrets: Vera Atkins and the Missing Agents of WWII. I found Violet Szabo’s and Virginia Hall’s stories particularly inspiring; and of course I have to mention the love affair between courier Odette Sansom and her circuit leader Peter Churchill in occupied Paris. (They wound up getting marriedafter the war, although the marriage didn’t last.)

But if I had to pick the one most useful book, it would be Joseph Persico’s Piercing the Reich: The Penetration of Nazi Germany by American Secret Agents During World War II. I’d had no idea American spies had been so active inside Germany! The Office of Strategic Services was willing to send in their agents, while the Special Operations Executive (in Britain) was reluctant because they figured they’d be sending their men into certain death. And yet many of the American spies who had begun setting up networks within Germany survived the experience. Persico’s book is completely riveting.

What I read for Petty Magic has led to an even longer list of books I still want to read—like Mark Seaman’s Bravest of the Brave, a biography of F.F.E. Yeo-Thomas, the English spy code-named ‘the White Rabbit.’ His wartime activity includes more than one highly improbable escape (though he was usually recaptured, and the Nazis tortured him horribly every time he was brought back in). So needless to say Jonah’s inspired by Yeo-Thomas.

There are several other books on espionage and World War II I enjoyed and learned a lot from, and you’ll find the full list in the acknowledgments. I also read a bit about witchcraft and folklore— scholarly works, mostly—and those were indirectly useful because I wanted to subvert and reinforce those classic tropes at the same time.

On a different note, because this is a book blog and also because this is my blog: I know you’re a great reader and lover of books. Are there any books you’re an evangelist for?

I adore Angela Carter, and I really wish she were more widely read and appreciated in the U.S. I love The Bloody Chamber and Nights at the Circus, and Wise Children, her last novel, is probably her best—(how often can you say that of a dearly departed novelist? although she was at her creative peak, dying of cancer in her early fifties)—and if you read it you will see just how much she has inspired me. ‘It doesn’t matter if what happens next spoils everything; the anticipation itself is always pure.’ Brilliant.

The other underappreciated writer I always gush about is Sheridan Le Fanu, the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer whose vampire novella, Carmilla (in the story collection In a Glass Darkly), predates Bram Stoker’s Dracula by a good twenty-five years. I’ve been reading Le Fanu’s biography, and a real-life ghost story involving his wife is particularly compelling—there’s a definite theme, in his fiction and in his life, of the dead coming back to claim the living. So you see, he was a gothic character in his own right; after his wife died he became a recluse, and his neighbors called him ‘the Invisible Prince.’ I’ve all but put him in my new novel. Which leads me to your next question…

What are your plans for the future? Can you tell us a little bit about what you’re working on now?

I’m working on a young adult novel, a ghost story set in Dublin in the 1860s, which may or may not turn into a trilogy. My immediate plan—once the Petty Magic publicity stuff has eased up—is to spend a few weeks in London and Edinburgh in November, wandering through graveyards and writing in pubs. I’m also taking a lot of notes for my next adult novel, which is probably going to be the most gothic thing yet.

Thanks, Camille! Not just for the interview, either.

* * * * * * * *

Petty Magic, which you can and should purchase for yourself and all your loved ones by clicking on the giant red IndieBound link below, was publishd by Crown today, October 5, 2010. For more information about Camille and her other books, visit her website. While you’re over there, check out her blog, which is not at all one of those author-blogs that only talks about the book that was just published. And to show your love for Petty Magic (and also to rock a very funny t-shirt or two), pop over to Camille’s cafepress store.

Shop Indie Bookstores

%d bloggers like this: